JUMP TO SOLUTION Solved

Original topic:

S23 ultra camera over exposed

(Topic created: 03-12-2023 08:15 AM)
6619 Views
Ash45
Asteroid
Options
Galaxy S23

image
Notice top three window panes on the right side. There are bricks on the wall but in the picture it's totally blown up.

Is anyone facing camera oversaturation issue with s23 ultra ? 
148 Replies
spagoot
Halo
Options
Galaxy S23
Same problem - this is purely a software issue. Samsung needs to just integrate gcam and stop trying (or i guess start trying)

It's also not actually RAW - it's samsung's proprietary version of raw
user2KBwgcVgSJ
Asteroid
Options
Galaxy S23
Finally! Because Samsungs' own Community voice box acknowledged there are in fact batches of this model that have epic camera quality fail that no update or program can fix, and many that are the as-advertised Best Camera in the industry, I am now awaiting a Third one to be sent that will have been PreChecked for the camera quality.
It should never have come to this. Hurts their otherwise great reputation, as well as their loyal support base. 
I hope now they do as promised - actually check this third one before sending it as a replacement. I will not tolerate a third defective one, nor should I be expected to.
OldSoldier
Halo
Options
Galaxy S23
What about the camera was defective?
0 Likes
user2KBwgcVgSJ
Asteroid
Options
Galaxy S23
Greetings, and presumptuous, "Thank you for your service."
The camera fo us was never sharp...on anything. Close up, medium distance, zoom. And when you looked at whatever you attempted to shoot, the results were grainy, absolutely no detail whatsoever, grainy as all heck, and some objects had an aura type outline around them.
I used to photograph for a wire service & did MLB games, where on a cloudy day or night game, you'd push the TriX 400 ASA film to around 1600 or 3200.
The results could be grainy enough to preclude detail, sometimes an aura as well.
This looks strangely similar, but is no way a related causality.
My Verizon helpline calls eventually revealed I was not the only one to get a lemon camera, as they were getting g many similar calls.
Many folks however were not as unfortunate and got perfectly fu crooning cameras in their phones.
I find it intolerable I was made to feel as if this was all my faulty opinion as to what a state of the art #1 camera should not be doing, and that the results were tolerable and what did I expect - this is a phone, not a camera. Alternately they offered the opinion it was the program that showed the images being at fault.
But for the fact that it looked just as awful on the camera image itself, and my old S21 started out its first 8 months with simply astounding clarity and extraordinary detail. It stopped less than a year new and that's why I needed to get the new, state of the art S23.
Planned obsolescence?
coley05
Asteroid
Options
Galaxy S23
I recently got the Galaxy S23 (not ultra or plus). When I take a picture it looks good but when I go to view it, I see that it automatically gets edited and no longer looks like the original version. Sometimes I'll catch it while it's doing this and the edited version looks worse. After it's processed it looks way too sharp. It emphasizes every little wrinkle, shadows under eyes, or even a flake of dry skin. What can I do to have the original version I saw in my preview without the extra processing?

I have turned off HDR and scene optimizer but this doesn't help to keep it looking like the preview I see when taking the picture. I just want it to look like it does before the system edits the picture. I returned the S22 due to this. I was hoping the S23 would be better, but now I'm debating returning and going back to an iPhone after being a Galaxy user for 8 years.

don't want to use pro or raw mode because I don't want to have to edit photos or take time to adjust settings while taking pictures. 
userZNnTdcqwZP
Supernova
Options
Galaxy S23
If you want to further adjust camera settings (such as HDR and picture softening), you can download Camera Assistant from Galaxy Store.

Plus, in pro mode, you can also use it as auto mode. Screenshot_20230312_111453_Camera_1000000384_1678634093.png
Biggus
Galaxy
Options
Galaxy S23
3rd party camera programs like OpenCamera allow you to turn off the sharpening and noise reduction and are your best bet. All that stuff is being done to cover up the fact that 108MP (or 200+MP) tiny sensors are a terrible idea and produce awful images in most lighting. The oversharpening exists to try to cover up detail lost from the huge amounts of noise reduction that needs to be done even on the stacked images the camera does by default without camera assistant's faster shutter option.

Binning 9 or 16 photo sites together doesn't improve anything if each is so small that in most indoor lighting 75% of the sites didn't capture enough photons to go over the noise floor and produce some kind of meaningful data. This is further exaggerated by the fact that most people light their homes with horridly yellow / orange 2700k or 3000k bulbs (despite the packaging a 3000k bulb isn't any kind of daylight, warm or otherwise). You don't notice because your eyes adapt and treat it as white. I do because I trained myself to not adapt over decades of photography so I'd be able to judge color properly. That affects cameras badly since everything on the market uses a color filter array with a 2 green / 1 blue / 1 red arrangement which means 3/4 of the sensors are receiving severely reduced levels of light (which makes them produce nothing but readout or amplification noise) in the first place

I don't generally get terrible oversharpening, but other artifacts are rampant. Even in bright daylight a quick zoom on tree leaves reveals where the heavy noise reduction turned leaves info somthing that looks like a watercolor filter was applied, so I never really use this phone outdoors like I did sometimes with the Note8. I still have to make the choice between:
1) Fast shutter reaction thanks to camera settings program, which also disables stacking which increases noise and makes images very undersaturated, but makes the camera take the picture when your hit the button and not up to a second later. I usually use this now, I never use my phone camera for anything but pictures of cats being silly or friends and I'd rather have almost B&W noisy images than a blur of something that happened after I took the picture
2) The pro raw camera, which produces incredibly blurry stacked images and hilariously noisy (I'm talking the worst low light sensor ever, Sigma SD9 / 1st Gen Foveon full color at its top ISO of 400 where large areas of the image were blotches of color due to the physics of the sensors) and unusable. Outdoors having 12 or 14 bit raw (Samsung claims 16 but since professional 35mm full frame doesn't pretend to produce more than 14 I'm calling BS. I'm sure they might be outputting 16 bit numbers and equally sure the 4 least significant bits are background noise in the best conditions).
3) Decide I might actually want to do something with the photos or am going outside and take a real camera.

Pro raw camera still outputs stacked raws so it doesn't completely solve this.

The sharpening tool in the photo editor is complete trash; anything higher than 8-9 out of 100 massively overprocesses everything.

I'm guessing to get the 200+ MP sensor looking good enough non-magnified to wow people at the store, they had to tack that oversharpening on to make he appearance of undoing the necessary noise reduction even at base ISO which is likely smearing colors across edges of objects (something harder to notice when there's an overly hard edge in the luminance data).

The worst part is that none of the sensor resolution increases had anything to do with quality increase; even for professional photography with *good* cameras those resolutions are rarely needed; it's all about presenting ever increasing specs to keep the appearance that there's any real reason to upgrade. Processors have barely improved, RAM has remained nearly identical, storage capability has stopped since microsd was removed, etc.
Biggus
Galaxy
Options
Galaxy S23
You may have gotten your wish. The new version of Samsung camera assistant has an "image softening" setting that works in photo mode, but I'd be willing to bet it really just turns off the sharpening or turns it down.
0 Likes
Biggus
Galaxy
Options
Galaxy S23
That does appear to be what it does. A picture taken with softening on high has about what I'd expect for sharpness given optical limits and no edge artifacts. Medium is a decent balance with artifacts gone but still slightly sharpened. Off, the default, produces stairstepping artifacts along high contrast edges and makes certain detail disappear (take a photo of text in a book from a few feet away, the text wouldn't be readable but with default sharpening parts of letters disappear.
user3J3Hu39qg5
Constellation
Options
Galaxy S23

I have the same exact issue as coley05.  I'm ready to go back to my S20 that took much better photos.   I can't seem to find camera assistant in the app store.  Any suggestions on finding it?

Thanks!

 

 
0 Likes